Henry L. Thompson, Ph.D

member emotional intelligence consortium

Affiliation: High Performing Systems, Inc.
Email: dick@hpsys.com

Biography

Henry L. (Dick) Thompson, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized consultant, educator, speaker and author. Over the past 30 years, he has gained valuable experience developing and leading teams—from the battlefield to the boardroom. He uses his vast experience and knowledge to help leaders, teams and organizations improve performance.

Dr. Thompson is the founder, President and CEO of High Performing Systems, Inc. (HPS), an international management consulting and training firm he founded in 1984. The philosophy of HPS is based on a systems approach to performance improvement. Clients are Fortune 500 companies, government agencies and a diverse group of public, private and international firms, including AT&T, Georgia-Pacific Corporation, Apple, Johnson & Johnson, General Mills, Owens-Corning, Delta Airlines, Wipro Technologies, Mohawk Industries and Titan America, to name a few.

He holds a BA in sociology from Methodist University, an MMAS in Continuous Operations from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and an MS and Ph.D. in psychology from The University of Georgia. Dr. Thompson was also a department chair and professor at The University of Georgia where he taught advanced courses in leadership and team dynamics.

Dr. Thompson’s work and ongoing research with emotional intelligence (EI) are well known in the EI community. His innovative approaches to EI research, training, certification, feedback and materials development make him a highly sought after EI speaker and consultant. He is the leading researcher on the interaction of EI, stress and leadership and is the creator of the Catastrophic Leadership Failure™ model based on this research. He has pioneered the Tandem Model of using the EQ-i® and Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test® (MSCEIT®) in combination. His research continues to explore the validity of EI models; EI and stress; the role of EI, IQ and leadership in success models; the relationship of EI to other models; and building Stress Resilient Emotional Intelligence™.

His work with stress management began with personal experience on the battlefield and evolved into a lifetime of study. He has held the honor of being one of the U.S. military’s subject matter experts on stress on the battlefield. His research has covered the impact of stress on decisionmaking, cognitive performance, aggressive behavior, sleep deprivation, leadership and emotionally intelligent behavior. He has published numerous articles on the topic and continues to conduct cutting-edge research on the impact of stress. His newly released ARSENAL™ program for managing stress sets a new standard for individual, team and organizational stress management.

A few of the professional organizations of which Dr. Thompson is a member include American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Type International, American Society for Training and Development, Academy of Management, New England Complex Systems Institute, Global Organizational Design Society, National Honor Society in Psychology, Society for Chaos Theory in Psychology and Life Sciences, and Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

Articles

Thompson, H.L. & Richardson, D. (1983). The rooster effect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 9, 3, pp. 415-425.

Pleban, R., Thomas, D. & Thompson, H. (1985). Physical fitness as a moderator of cognitive work capacity and fatigue onset under sustained combat-like operations. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments and Computers, 17(1), 86-89.

Thompson, H.L. (1984). High performing staffs part I: What is it? Army Organizational Effectiveness Journal, Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 7-15.

Thompson, H.L. (1984). High performing staffs part II: Developing and sustaining the high performing staffs. Army Organizational Effectiveness Journal, Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 6-16.

Johnson, A., Winter, P.A., Reio, T.G., Thompson, H.L., & Petrosko, J.M. (2008). Managerial recruitment: The influence of personality and ideal candidate characteristics. Journal of Management Development, 27, 6, 631-648.

Book Chapters

Thompson, H.L. (2009). Emotional intelligence, stress, and catastrophic leadership failure. In Hughes, M., Thompson, H.L., & Terrell, J.P. (Eds.). Handbook for developing emotional and social intelligence: Best practices, case studies, and strategies (pp. 111-138). San Francisco: Pfeiffer.

Thompson, H.L. (2009). Using the EQ-i and MSCEIT in tandem. In Hughes, M., Thompson, H.L., & Terrell, J.P. (Eds.). Handbook for developing emotional and social intelligence: Best practices, case studies, and strategies (pp. 257-281). San Francisco: Pfeiffer.

Books and Technical Manuals

Hughes, M., Thompson, H.L., & Terrell, J.P. (2009). Handbook for developing emotional and social intelligence: Best practices, case studies, and strategies. San Francisco: Pfeiffer.

Hughes, M., Thompson, H.L., & Terrell, J.B. (2010). Team Emotional and Social Intelligence Survey: Technical manual. Denver: Collaborative Growth.

Thompson, H.L. (1996). Jung’s Function-Attitudes Explained. Watkinsville, GA: Wormhole Publishing.

Thompson, H.L. (1997). The CommunicationWheel Workbook. Watkinsville, GA: Wormhole Publishing.

Thompson, H.L. (2000). Introduction to The CommunicationWheel®. Watkinsville, GA: Wormhole Publishing.

Thompson, H.L. (2001). Introduction to FIRO Element B in Organizations. Watkinsville, GA: Wormhole Publishing.

Thompson, H.L. (2010). The CommunicationWheel: A resource book (3rd Edition). Watkinsville, GA: Wormhole Publishing.

Thompson, H.L. (2010). The stress effect: Why smart leaders make dumb decisions---and what to do about It. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Thompson, H.L. (Scheduled for 2010). The FIRO Element B technical manual. Watkinsville, GA: Wormhole Publishing.

Thompson, H.L., Tamm, J., & Luyet, R. (Scheduled for 2010). The Collaborative Skills Climate Survey technical manual. Watkinsville, GA: Wormhole Publishing.

 

 

 

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